Botched execution brings reprieve | Cincinnati.com | The Cincinnati Enquirer

By , September 16, 2009 11:46 am

LUCASVILLE – A condemned inmate whose execution was stopped because of problems finding a usable vein will remain in the same maximum security prison over the next week.

Prisons spokeswoman Julie Walburn says inmate Romell Broom has been placed in a cell in the infirmary at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville.

Walburn says Broom is on close watch similar to the constant observation of death row inmates in the three days before an execution.

Death row inmates are housed in a Youngstown prison and executed in the death chamber at Lucasville. There’s no precedent for housing an inmate whose execution didn’t work.

After an execution team spent about two hours trying to find a usable vein on Broom’s arms and legs, Gov. Ted Strickland ordered a week’s reprieve for the 53-year-old convicted rapist-murderer from Cleveland.

In a prison witness room, the parents and aunt of Tryna Middleton – who was fatally stabbed on Sept. 21, 1984 – watched silently as prison nurses struggled to keep Broom’s veins open for a lethal mix of chemicals to execute him.

There were so many logistical problems encountered Tuesday by an experienced execution team that Broom was never moved to the injection table in the adjoining death chamber. The Middletons and four news reporters, including from The Enquirer, watched the process via television monitors as prison staff tried to hook Broom to tubes in preparation for lethal injection.

Several times, Broom rolled onto his left side, pointed at veins, straightened tubes or massaged his own arms to help prison staff keep a vein open. He was clearly frustrated as he leaned back on the gurney, covering his face with his hands and visibly crying. His stomach heaved upward and his feet twitched. There is no audio from the holding cell, so reporters could only watch his movements. When the staff tried to put IVs in his legs, Broom looked up toward the camera above, appearing to grimace, at least four times, from pain.

via Botched execution brings reprieve | Cincinnati.com | The Cincinnati Enquirer.

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